1972 Datsun 240 Z

Japanese cars are built very lightly. A lightly built car can boast both a stout inline 6 cylinder engine and a fully trimmed interior, along with a full tank of gas, and still weigh under 2200 pounds. A light build is desirable in that it contributes to impressive handling and speed. Unfortunately, lightly built cars rust and decay in ways that defy logic and surprise even the most seasoned professionals.

This early 1972 240Z was supposed to be a clean car. A Florida car with quarter panels that had never been packed with slushy salt. But this poor car began to crumble, in unimaginable ways, the moment our 8 inch grinder started whirring. What started out as light restoration project scheduled between larger projects, turned into a 700 hour complete overhaul of all the sheet metal and a completely new interior.

The gaping holes we discovered in the floorboards were patched with 18 gauge sheet metal and a clean quarter panel was spot welded to the left side. After being fortified with new metal the body was sealed, epoxy primed, and painted its original ivory white, a subtle but beautiful departure from the refrigerator white that had been used to repaint the car at some point. All of the window seals and weather stripping were replaced with new old stock parts. We also discovered that the interior had been fitted with an aftermarket shag carpet set sometime in the 70's, making the interior look more like a huge, filthy sheepdog than a sleek sports car. The interior was returned to its original black diamond patterned vinyl. Finally, we rebuilt and fit a trio of matching numbers weber DCOE 40's to the engine... a kind of icing on the kagami mochi.
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